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013977 Teaching and Learning in Practice

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular semester, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2015 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Education: Adult Learning and Applied Linguistics/TESOL
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Undergraduate

Result type: Grade, no marks

Anti-requisite(s): 015902 Teaching and Learning Practices

Description

This subject introduces principles and practices associated with both teaching and facilitating learning, which are relevant for a range of adult learning contexts. As such the subject both extends learner understanding of a range of concepts introduced in other foundation subjects, as well as providing an introduction to more specific subjects which focus on learning and development in more specialised contexts (e.g. education institutions, organisations, community sector).

Subject objectives

a. To consider the factors that impact on learning in a variety of learning contexts
b. To critically analyse some of the theories that can inform effective teaching and learning practice
c. To draw on a variety of traditions to plan, prepare and facilitate learning experiences
d. To demonstrate skills associated with planning a learning experience
e. To display a capacity to present and justify a learning experience appropriate for selected situations and audiences
f. To identify and practice communication related skills for facilitation of effective learning
g. To observe, reflect on and critically analyse teaching and facilitation strategies demonstrated by experienced adult educators and colleagues.
h. To ensure a healthy and safe learning environment for both the learners and presenters

Teaching and learning strategies

Students will typically experience the learning in this subject through the following processes and/or content that will be covered. The teaching and learning strategies employed in this subject will include lecture input, structured discussions and activities, and individual research and engagement in assignments which critically examine and apply the knowledge gained in the class and the readings. A website for the subject will be established and maintained using the communication and learning system UTSOnline (http://online.uts.edu.au). All students will be expected to access the UTSOnline site to download templates/ pro-formas for assessment tasks, as well as to access web-based resources. Students in the block mode delivery classes are expected to check the UTSOnline site for this subject on a weekly basis for any new Announcements. The UTSOnline site will also be useful to students as a way of interacting with other students in the class.

Mode of Delivery
The subject is offered in weekly face-to-face mode and in block mode.

Content

The table below provides an indicative plan of the sessions for classes in the different delivery modes for the semester. Some adjustments to these plans may be made during the semester. The contents of the subject are motivated by the following two broad questions, and the more specific related questions:

  1. What do the learners need to learn?
    • How do the learners need to know this?
    • What are measurable and recognisable outcomes from this learning?
  2. How can an adult educator teach to facilitate this learning?
    • What are different teaching methods that are available to the adult educator, and which of these methods are suitable for the learning that their learners need to achieve?
    • How can the adult educator ensure that the learning environment is safe for both their learners and the educator?
    • What teaching resources can the adult educator use to support their teaching and the learner's learning?
    • How should the adult educator plan their teaching session?
    • What considerations are there for teaching one to one, and teaching a group?

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Essay

Intent:

To discuss the influence of teachers' actions on the learning environment.

Objective(s):

a, b, g and h

Weight: 35
Length: 1000 words (Bachelor's students) 1500 words (Graduate Certificate students)
Criteria:

Your essay will be assessed on how well you have met the objectives of the task:

Your essay has considered how teachers’ actions and styles impact on learning in a selection of learning contexts.

  • 2 or 3 aspects of the learning environment are selected.
  • here are details and concrete examples of teachers’ actions and styles.
  • There are details and concrete examples of the impact of teachers’ actions and styles on the learners.

Your essay critically analyses some of the theories that can inform effective teaching and learning practice.

  • There are references to theoretical ideas about what influences the learning environment from Semeraz (2006) and other scholarly readings.

Your essay shows that you have observed reflected on and critically analysed teaching and facilitation strategies demonstrated by experienced adult educators.

  • The data from two observations are compared and contrasted.
  • The theoretical ideas from the readings are examined in relation to the data that were gathered.

The findings and the analysis in a clearly written academic essay.

  • There is a clear introduction that states what the essay is about, has a thesis statement, and outlines how the thesis will be argued.
  • There is a conclusion that restates the thesis, summarises the key insights that emerged in the essay, and how they support the thesis.
  • The body of the essay logically develops the arguments for the thesis.
  • Ideas from the references are used selectively and purposefully, and integrated effectively into the text.
  • The essay is written in well-structured paragraphs.
  • The essay is carefully proofread for grammatical, spelling and typographical errors.
  • In-text references and the reference list are complete, accurate and follow the Harvard (UTS) style.
  • The essay is submitted on time.

Assessment task 2: Portfolio

Intent:

To document the planning, delivery and reflective analysis of a teaching and learning process.

Objective(s):

c, d, e and f

Weight: 65
Length: 2000 words (Bachelor's students) 2500 words (Graduate Certificate students)
Criteria:

Your Portfolio will be assessed on how well you have met the objectives of the task:

Your Portfolio provides evidence of skills associated with planning a learning experience.

  • The learning objectives are clear and measurable.
  • The lesson/ session plan describes in detail how the lesson/ session is to be conducted.
  • The lesson/ session plan is realistic and viable within the given constraints.

Your Portfolio presents and justifies a learning experience appropriate for a specified situation and audience.

  • Choice of topic, learning objectives, methods and sequencing are viable and mutually compatible, and are justified in relation to who the learners are, and other situational factors

Your Portfolio presents evidence of applying communication related skills for facilitation of effective learning, and ensuring a healthy and safe learning environment for both the learners and presenters.

  • The communication and affective dimensions of the Learning Exchange process are addressed in the planning and observations of the Learning Exchange.

Your Portfolio includes critical reflections and analysis of what it means to become a teacher/ facilitator of learning.

  • Concepts of critical reflection and teaching are defined with reference to scholarly sources.
  • Close observations of learning and teaching in the Learning Exchange are examined and used to support the argument of the thesis.
  • Ideas from the scholarly texts, including the required readings, are critically examined in relation to the data from the observations and reflections.
  • The question of the essay topic is clearly addressed.

Your Portfolio documents the planning, observations and critical analysis of the learning from the Learning Exchange and other relevant experiences and readings in the subject in a Portfolio.

  • There is a clear introduction that states what the essay is about, has a thesis statement, and outlines how the thesis will be argued.
  • There is a conclusion that restates the thesis, summarises the key insights that emerged in the essay, and how they support the thesis.
  • The body of the essay logically develops the arguments for the thesis
  • Ideas from the references are used selectively and purposefully, and integrated effectively into the text.
  • The essay is written in well-structured paragraphs.
  • The essay is carefully proofread for grammatical, spelling and typographical errors.
  • In-text references and the reference list are complete, accurate and follow the Harvard (UTS) style.
  • The Portfolio is submitted on time.

Required texts

Students are required to access the Subject Readings, either electronically or in hardcopy.

References

Athanasou, J. (ed.), 2008, Adult Education and Training, David Barlow Publishing, Australia.
Blanchard, P.N. and Thacker, J.W. 2004, Effective Training Systems, Strategies and Practices, Pearson Prentice Hall.
Brookfield, Stephen D. 1990, The Skillful Teacher: On Technique, Trust and Responsiveness in the Classroom, Josey-Bass, San Francisco.
Caffarella, R. 2002, Planning Programs for Adult Learners: A Practical Guide for Educators, Trainers, and Staff Developers, 2nd edition, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.
Corder, N. 2008, Learning to Teach Adults, 2nd edition, Routledge, Oxon, UK.
Curzon, L.B. 1997, Teaching in Further Education: An Outline of Principles and Practice, Continuum, London.
Fawbert, F. (ed.), 2008, Teaching in Post-Compulsory Education: Skills, Standards and Lifelong Learning, Contiuum, London.
Foley, G. (ed.), 2004, Dimensions of Adult Learning: Adult education and training in a global era, Allen & Unwin, NSW.
Gower, R. et al, 2005, Teaching Practice: A handbook for teachers in training, MacMillan, Oxford.
Hillier, Y. 2005, Reflective Teaching in Further and Adult Education, 2nd edition, Continuum, London & New York.
Jarvis, P. 2004, Adult Education & Lifelong Learning: Theory and practice, 3rd edition, Routledge Falmer, London.
Jarvis, P. (ed.) 2006, The Theory and Practice of Teaching, 2nd edition, Routledge, London & New York.
Killen, R. 2006, Effective Teaching Strategies: Lessons from Research and Practice, 4th edition, Social Science Press, Australia.
Killen, R. 2005, Programming and Assessment for Quality Teaching and Learning, Thomson, Vic.
Knowles, M. et al, 1998, The Adult Learner, 5th edition, Butterworth-Heinemann, Houston.
Kroehnert, G. 2000, Basic Training: A Handbook for New Trainers, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, Sydney.
Malouf, D. 1994, How to teach adults in a fun and exciting way, Business and Professional Publishing , Australia.
McCain, D. V. and Tobey, D.D. 2004, Facilitation Basics, ASTD Press, VA.
Merriam, S.B. & Brockett, R.G. 2007, The Profession and Practice of Adult Education: An Introduction, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.
Rogers, A. and Horrocks, N. 2010, Teaching Adults, 4th ed., McGraw Hill & Open University Press, Maidenhead Berkshire, UK.
Rogers, J. 2007, Adults Learning, 5th ed., Open University Press, Maidenhead Berkshire, UK.
Scrivener, J. 1994. Learning Teaching: A guidebook for English Language Teachers. Heinemann ELT, UK
Taylor, K., Marienau, C. and Fiddler, M. (2000). Developing Adult Learners: Strategies for Teachers and Trainers, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.
Tovey, M.D. and Lawlor, D.R. 2008, Training in Australia, 3rd ed., Pearson, NSW, Australia.
Walsh, J. A. and Sattes, B. D. 2005, Quality Questioning: Research-based Practice to Engage Every Learner, Corwin & Sage, CA.
Westwood, P. 2008, What Teachers Need to Know about Teaching Methods, ACER, VIC.