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79708 Contemporary Business Law

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2018 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Law
Credit points: 6 cp
Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

This subject provides students with an understanding of the Australian legal system and law-making process. Students first explore the laws of property, torts and contract to develop a framework for understanding subsequent business law topics. Areas of law that are of practical relevance to business are then explored such as commercial contracts and trade practices legislation, consumer protection, business structures, competition law, insolvency, and intellectual property. A focus on recent developments in these areas ensures that students can apply their knowledge of emerging trends in business law on completion of this subject.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:

1. Apply a coherent knowledge of Australia’s legal system and the law-making process;
2. Identify the relevance and impact of law on the business community;
3. Identify and apply Australian business law;
4. Investigate contemporary issues from a legal, business and personal perspective; and
5. Speak and write in a logical, succinct and persuasive manner as individuals and in groups.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the development of the following graduate attributes which reflect the course intended learning outcomes:

  • Legal Knowledge
    An advanced and integrated understanding of a complex body of legal knowledge including the Australian legal system, social justice, cultural and international contexts, the principles and values of ethical practice, and contemporary developments in law and its professional practice. (1.0)
  • Research Skills
    Well-developed cognitive and practical skills necessary to identify, research, evaluate and synthesise relevant factual, legal and policy issues and demonstrate intellectual and practical skills necessary to justify and interpret theoretical propositions, legal methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions (4.0)
  • Communication and Collaboration
    Effective and appropriate professional communication skills including highly effective use of the English language, an ability to inform, analyse, report and persuade using an appropriate medium and message and an ability to respond appropriately. (5.0)

Teaching and learning strategies

Strategy 1: Preparation for class.

Students familiarise themselves with the substantive law to be covered in the seminars before each class, by reading and reflecting on the prescribed reading. The preparatory readings and proposed timetable for classes is available on UTS Online. This is an essential learning strategy for this subject. Students are also encouraged to bring to class a recent business-related article from the web or a newspaper demonstrating some legal issue. Preparation for class enables students to develop knowledge that forms the basis of their participation in seminars as well as small group collaborative discussions.

Strategy 2: Consolidating Learning in Seminars

The subject will be taught through a series of interactive seminars. During class, students will discuss concepts and ideas that have been raised by the readings and their responses to prepared questions as a class and in small group collaborative discussions. Students may also present business-related articles in class to discuss the legal implications. In addition, students undertake readings to consolidate their learning. Reading and discussing the weekly prescribed readings helps all students to understood business law concepts and how the law applies to Australian businesses.

Strategy 3: Individual and Collaborative Research

Students research a topic relating to law and business in groups and present their findings to the class. Participating in group research and presentations provides students with an opportunity to integrate the learning from their preparation for interactive seminars and the research conducted for their presentation. By drawing on their preparation in this way students further test and develop their knowledge of business law together with their research skills and capacity to collaborate. Students also develop skills in presentation and communication as they present their group research, raise questions, contribute their observations and respond to their peers. In this way, students develop and test their learning while also obtaining feedback from their teacher and peers (see Feedback below). Students also present their individual research in an individual report.

Strategy 4: Feedback

Both formal and informal feedback will be provided throughout the session. Feedback comes from a variety of sources including: from peers in the class who respond to a student’s contribution in the class or on UTSOnline; from the teacher in response to a student’s questions in class, presentations and written assignments; and from personal reflection. Students have an opportunity to test their understanding of the readings completed in preparation for the seminar by asking questions or contributing their observations. In this way, the teacher will address and explore students’ understanding and respond to students’ questions and observations while also providing feedback on students’ developing understanding. Formal feedback is offered on students’ case notes, seminar presentations and research essays providing an opportunity for students to implement suggestions in subsequent assessment tasks.

Subject Delivery

The subject will be taught in weekly interactive seminars.

Content (topics)

  1. Introduction to the Australian legal system
  2. The law-making process
  3. Business Structures
  4. Insolvency
  5. Property Law
  6. Torts
  7. Contractual Relations
  8. Consumer Protection
  9. Competition Law

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Quiz

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2 and 3

This task contributes specifically to the development of the following graduate attributes:

1.0

Weight: 10%
Length:

One (1) hour including reading time. 500 words (equivalent)

Criteria:
  • Apply a coherent knowledge of Australia’s legal system and the law making process (SLO1, GA1).
  • Identify the relevance and impact of law on the business community (SLO2, GA1).
  • Identify areas of Australian law that are relevant to the business community. (SLO3, GA1)

Assessment task 2: Group Assignment

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

4 and 5

This task contributes specifically to the development of the following graduate attributes:

1.0, 4.0 and 5.0

Weight: 40%
Length:

Part A - Group Presentation: see Further Information below.

Part B - Individual Report: 1500-1800 words.

Criteria:
  • Investigate a contemporary issue from a legal, business and personal perspective (SLO4, GA 1 & 4).
  • Speak and write in a logical, succinct and persuasive manner (SLO5, GA5).
  • Utlise appropriate communication strategies when presenting group research (SLO5, GA5).
  • Presentation is conducted within the specified time constraints (SLO5, GA5).

Assessment task 3: Final Exam

Objective(s):

This task addresses the following subject learning objectives:

1, 2, 3 and 4

This task contributes specifically to the development of the following graduate attributes:

1.0 and 5.0

Weight: 50%
Length:

2,500 words (equivalent)

Criteria:
  • Demonstrate a coherent knowledge of Australia’s legal system and the law making process (SLO1, GA1 & 5);
  • Identify the relevance and impact of law on the business community (SLO2, GA1 & 5);
  • Identify and apply Australian business law (SLO3, GA1 & 5);
  • Examine contemporary issues from a legal and business perspective (SLO4, GA1 & 5)

Required texts

  • John Taggart & M Squire, Contemporary Business Law (Tekniks, 2016)
  • The session notes provided during the subject will be accessible on UTSOnline.

Recommended texts

Note: Students are not expected to read all these references. They are available for research topics or some students may find them easier or provide more depth.

  • Paul Latimer, Australian Business Law, Oxford University Press, latest edition
  • Turner, Australian Commercial Law, Law Book Co, latest edition
  • Davenport and Parker, Business & Law in Australia, Thomson Reuters, latest edition
  • Vermeesch and Lindgren's Business Law of Australia - LexisNexus latest edition

Students’ attention will be drawn to a number of useful websites throughout the course

References

  • Law Handbook www.handbook.uts.edu.au/law/index.html
  • Law Webpage www.law.uts.edu.au/
  • Student Admin Unit www.sau.uts.edu.au
  • Student Centres www.uts.edu.au/students/centres.html
  • UTS Policies www.gsu.uts.edu.au/policies/index.html

Other resources

UTS LIBRARY

The UTS Library has a wide range of services and resources that you will find useful, including law reports, law journals, textbooks, and access to online resources www.lib.uts.edu.au.

Relevant materials in this subject may also be available on Closed Reserve, which is a special borrowing service that allows you to use the material for two hours or overnight, to ensure the materials are available to many students. Materials on closed reserve are listed in the library catalogue by subject details and Subject Co-ordinator.

LEARNING SKILLS

The BELL (Becoming an Effective Lifelong Learner) website provides information, self-testing and links to help you develop your learning skills. Visit the BELL web site www.bell.uts.edu.au.

UTSOnline

This subject has a UTSOnline site (http://online.uts.edu.au/). The site may include announcements made in seminars, copies of seminar overheads/slides, and clarification of administrative and assignment matters. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they are registered on UTSOnline for this subject, and regularly check UTSOnline for announcements.