University of Technology, Sydney

Staff directory | Webmail | Maps | Newsroom | What's on

92638 Foundations of the Australian Healthcare System

Warning: The information on this page is indicative. The subject outline for a particular session, location and mode of offering is the authoritative source of all information about the subject for that offering. Required texts, recommended texts and references in particular are likely to change. Students will be provided with a subject outline once they enrol in the subject.

Subject handbook information prior to 2018 is available in the Archives.

UTS: Health
Credit points: 6 cp

Subject level:

Postgraduate

Result type: Grade and marks

There are course requisites for this subject. See access conditions.

Description

In this subject, students tackle practical challenges at the cutting edge of health service design and management. Undertaking research in realistic and professionally relevant projects, students develop innovative solutions to the structure and management of a range of health services.

Students begin their work on campus, working to develop and refine their knowledge of the major structural and functional components of healthcare systems by examining the Australian system. By understanding how health systems and other service provision models develop, evolve and perform, students acquire a foundation for leading and influencing the direction of health care.

Working on a challenge brief from a portfolio of health sector projects, students work with others, conducting valuable research and generating meaningful solutions for the sector. The projects share a common focus on the changing relationships between healthcare providers, the insurance sector, government and the wider community. Industry partners may include public, private, primary and tertiary care as well as payers, providers and suppliers.

Subject learning objectives (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this subject students should be able to:
A. Appraise the structural and functional components of the Australian healthcare system and the roles and responsibilities of the differing levels of government;
B. Explain trends and structure and functional challenges in service provision models, health system performance and health service outcomes and outputs within the Australian healthcare system;
C. Create a variety of ways in which complex issues can be effectively communicated for a variety of target audiences;
D. Reflect on the impact of ongoing colonisation and its pervasive discourse on Indigenous Australians and their health and wellbeing for the design, delivery and management of the Australian healthcare system;
E. Examine the role of person-centred care in the Australian health care system;
F. Demonstrate collaboration and contribution to team work.

Course intended learning outcomes (CILOs)

This subject also contributes specifically to the following graduate attributes:

  • Reflective, critical thinker who influences practice, policy and research to achieve clinical excellence and transform healthcare services. (1.0)
  • Communicates effectively and appropriately in challenging, complex and diverse situations. (4.0)
  • Professional cultural competency which contributes to the health and well being of Indigenous Australians, inclusive of physical, social, emotional and spiritual wellness. (5.0)
  • Critically reflect upon the impact of ongoing colonisation and its pervasive discourse on Indigenous Australians and their health and wellbeing. (5.2)

Teaching and learning strategies

This subject is taught using a variety of teaching and learning strategies emphasising active and applied approaches to developing key skills and knowledge. This subject will not use lecture notes to deliver content. Rather, our valuable time in class will be spent engaging in active learning, problem solving and skills’ development which will draw upon the content you have explored prior to class. You will also be provided with valuable, real-time feedback to assist you in managing your learning.

Applying appropriate online and face-to-face on-campus learning, the subject will use the following:

Case Scenarios
Cases will be used to help students explore health services management scenarios. Cases depict authentic health service delivery contexts and the issues which arise. Students read and discuss these scenarios to learn concepts, interpret information, form judgments and develop creative solutions. Critical thinking is developed through analysis, interpretation of, and reflection on, issues or situations.

Small Group Problem Based Learning
Working in their own small teams, students engage in real-time, shared inquiry and decision-making activities. Students are further challenged by engaging in self-directed learning, team discussion and problem solving that will develop their disciplinary knowledge.

Simulation
Students participate in simulation sessions that focus on integration of key concepts and skills. Simulation activities are practical learning experiences designed to give students exposure to a comprehensive range of scenarios that may be encountered in workplace settings. Activities may include the use of audio-visual aids, group SMS and guest briefings. Students learn and practice a variety of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills with case scenarios in a comfortable, small-group context.

Briefings and Roundtables
This subject does not use lectures. However, where required short briefings and debriefings are given by the lecturer in response to student-identified learning needs, challenging content or to reflect on a particular skill area or exercise. Roundtables, in which subject matter is discussed in an informal setting, may also be used.

Content (topics)

  • Introduction to Health Services Management
  • Thinking and Communicating Critically in Health Management
  • The Australian healthcare system
  • Health system inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
  • Alternative methods of health services delivery and financing
  • Comparative healthcare systems method and case studies
  • The political, economic, social, and cultural determinants of current national, regional, and local healthcare policies
  • National health reform
  • Consumers and advocacy?
  • Role of policy and media in health services
  • Challenges in achieving healthcare outcomes

Assessment

Assessment task 1: Response to the Challenge Brief

Intent:

Students tackle practical challenges at the cutting edge of health service design and management. Through a blending of real-life, professionally relevant action-orientated projects, students collaborate with partner organisations and industry leaders to develop innovative solutions to the structuring and management of health services in a range of settings.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

A, B, C, D and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 4.0 and 5.0

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 60%
Length:

Word Count for components of this assessment include:

  1. An email response to the client in which students will re-frame the client’s challenge, describe your understanding of the challenge and your initial approach to the problem (10% of the total assessment task weighting) (200-400 words)
  2. A Literature Review related to the problem brief designed to form an attachment to your email response to the client (40% of the total assessment task weighting) (1600 words)
  3. A group authored report Document (50% of the total assessment task weighting) (2000 words)
Criteria:

20% Correctly identifies and demonstrates an in-depth comprehensive analysis of the topic and material under consideration

20% Evaluates and reframes the issues within the context of the healthcare environment demonstrating a depth of knowledge

40% Generates a clear and logical approach to the issues and material under consideration presenting well-established and supported approaches with explicit evidence, examples and details.

10% Validates perspectives through correct interpretation and explicit linkage of relevant and current literature (> year 2004) to the assessment focus

10% Produces correct grammar, spelling, formatting, style (essay) and referencing

Assessment task 2: Viva Voce

Intent:

Verbal presentation and advocacy is essential to work as a health service manager. The Viva Voce allows for the simulation of a presentation and conversation to peers and decision-makers in relation to their pre-prepared written material.

This presentation format develops real-world skills in succinct and constrained presentation of complex work.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

B, C, D, E and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 5.2

Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Length:

Approximately 10 minutes per student.

Criteria:

30% Demonstrates an in-depth comprehensive analysis of the topic and material under consideration. Information is well developed and clarity of purpose is effectively exhibited throughout the assessment.

20% Able to use assessor questions to further demonstrate complete explanation of key concepts, theories and/or practice is made, drawing on relevant material under consideration.

40% Generates argument and/or concepts which are novel, fit-for-purpose and supported with explicit evidence, examples and details.

10% Formulates a clear and logical approach to the material under consideration.

Assessment task 3: Engagement with learning resources and contribution to teamwork

Intent:

Preparation and meaningful engagment with a variety of resources is essential to collaboration and teamwork, skills that are critical to the role of a health service manager. The intent of this assessment is to emphasise and encourage students’ contribution to teamwork.

Objective(s):

This assessment task addresses subject learning objective(s):

C and F

This assessment task contributes to the development of graduate attribute(s):

1.0 and 4.0

Type: Portfolio
Groupwork: Individual
Weight: 20%
Criteria:

40% Evidence of preparation and engagement with the pre-session learning resources, demonstrated by informed contribution to in-class discussions in the workshops. Demonstrates an in-depth comprehensive analysis of the topic and material under consideration.

20% Able to use teacher and peer questions to further demonstrate complete explanation of key concepts, theories and/or practice is made, drawing on relevant material under consideration.

40% Demonstrates collaboration and contribution to team's development of the response to the Challenge Brief.

Required texts

Duckett, S. & Willcox, S. 2015, The Australian health care system, 5th edn, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, Vic.

The following documents need to be available electronically - there is no need to print them out.

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2014, Australia’s health 2016, AIHW, Canberra, ACT.
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=60129555544

Council of Australian Government, 2011, National health reform agreement, COAG, Canberra, ACT.
www.federalfinancialrelations.gov.au/content/npa/health_reform/national-agreement.pdf

Council of Australian Government, 2012, National healthcare agreement 2012, COAG, Canberra, ACT.
www.federalfinancialrelations.gov.au/content/npa/healthcare/national-agreement.pdf

COAG Reform Council, 2013, Healthcare 2011-12: comparing performance across Australia, COAG Reform Council, Sydney.
www.coagreformcouncil.gov.au/reports/healthcare/healthcare-2011-12-comparing-performance-across-australia

Duckett, S., Swerissen, H., and Moran, G. (2017). Building better foundations for primary care,Grattan Institute.

https://grattan.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Building-better-foundations-for-primary-care.pdf

Department of Health and Ageing, 2010, Building a 21st century primary health care system: Australia’s primary health care system, Australian Government, Canberra.
www.yourhealth.gov.au/internet/yourhealth/publishing.nsf/content/report-primaryhealth

Department of Health and Ageing, 2009, Primary health care reform in Australia – report to support Australia’s first national primary health care strategy, Australian Government, Canberra.
www.yourhealth.gov.au/internet/yourhealth/publishing.nsf/Content/nphc-draftreportsupp-toc/$FILE/NPHC-supp.pdf

Recommended texts

Palmer, G.R. & Short, S.D. 2014, Health care and public policy: an Australian analysis, 5th edn, Palgrave Macmillan, Melbourne, Vic.

Taylor, S., Foster, M. & Fleming, J. 2008, Health care practice in Australia: policy, context and innovations, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, Vic.

Willis, E., Reynolds, L. & Keleher, H. 2012, Understanding the Australian health care system, 2nd edn, Elsevier, Sydney, NSW.

References

Refer to UTSOnline for access to up to date references for this subject

Other resources

UTS Student Centre
Building 10
Monday to Friday: 9am - 5pm
Tel: 1300 ASK UTS (1300 275 887)

Details for student centres: www.uts.edu.au/current-students/contacts/general-contacts
For other resources/information refer to the Faculty of Health website (www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-health), the Health Student Guide (www.uts.edu.au/sites/default/files/uts-health-student-guide.pdf) and UTSOnline at: https://online.uts.edu.au/webapps/login/

UTS Library
The Library has a wide range of resources, facilities and services to support you including textbooks, subject readings, old exam papers, academic writing guides, health literature databases, workshops, a gaming room and bookable group study rooms. There is also a team of librarians to help you with all your questions.
W: lib.uts.edu.au, Facebook: utslibrary, Twitter: @utslibrary Tel: (02) 9514 3666

Improve your academic and English language skills
Marks for all assessment tasks such as assignments and examinations are given not only for what you write but also for how you write. If you would like the opportunity to improve your academic and English language skills, make an appointment with the HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support) Service in Student Services.

HELPS (Higher Education Language & Presentation Support)
HELPS provides assistance with English language proficiency and academic language. Students who need to develop their written and/or spoken English should make use of the free services offered by HELPS, including academic language workshops, vacation intensive courses, drop-in consultations, individual appointments and Conversations@UTS (www.ssu.uts.edu.au/helps). HELPS staff are also available for drop-in consultations at the UTS Library. Phone (02) 9514 9733

Please see www.uts.edu.au for additional information on other resources provided to students by UTS.